UK BIM Requirement Pushes Industry Forward: ASHRAE Winter Conference Features BIM Sessions for Practitioners

Jan. 13, 2016

Contact: Jodi Scott

Public Relations

678-539-1140

jscott@ashrae.org

ATLANTA – While the United Kingdom’s Government Construction Strategy mandated use of Level 2 building information modeling (BIM) on all public sector projects by 2016, recent surveys show that fewer than 15 percent of firms are fully prepared to do so.

“There is a very strong push for BIM in the UK,” Tim Dwyer said. “While the majority of firms have indicated they are not ready for the mandate (84 percent), nearly two-thirds have indicated it will be good for the building industry and is the future for building services.”

Successful collaborative efforts within firms and between firms for BIM are presented in a session Dwyer is chairing at the ASHRAE 2016 Winter Conference, which takes place Jan. 23-27, Orlando, Fla. The ASHRAE co-sponsored AHR Expo is being held Jan. 25-27, next door at the Orange County Convention Center. To register for the ASHRAE Conference, which includes free access to the Expo, visit www.ashrae.org/orlando.

The Technical Program features eight tracks, some 100 sessions and more than 300 speakers. It runs Sunday, Jan. 24, through Wednesday, Jan. 27, and offers over 200 Professional Development Hours, as well as Continuing Education Units, which can be applied toward a Professional Engineering license in many states, including the state of Florida.

Dwyer’s seminar focuses on “Delivering Building Performance through Collaboration and Integration.” He notes that with an ever-increasing demand for more stringent building environmental requirements, collaboration across the building ‘team’ is critical to deliver effective buildings that meet standards and performance metrics.

“Successful projects do not come from ‘silo’ working practices, and increasingly the engineer will be the lead for interdisciplinary design solutions that benefit from the integrating tools, which include BIM, and technologies as well as timely, and properly informed, client communication and interaction,” he said. The seminar takes place Tuesday, Jan. 26.

Other sessions that incorporate BIM are:

  • Do Tall, Super Tall and Mega Tall Buildings Consume More Energy than Conventional Buildings or Do They Conserve More Energy?
  • New CFD Techniques for Design of Air Distribution Systems
  • BIM Strategies for Energy Modeling and MEP Design Consulting
  • Improving the Design and Performance of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems
  • Building Modeling Simulation
  • Building Modeling and Optimization
  • Advancements in Energy Modeling
  • Strategies to Improve Building Models and Operation
  • Simulation for Cutting-Edge Building Design

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 54,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

 

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New Residential IAQ Guideline Contains Changes Regarding Use of High Efficiency Filters

ATLANTA – With recent research showing that ultrafine particles are more hazardous to human health than originally thought, higher-efficiency filters should be used, according to the newly published 2015 version of ASHRAE’s residential indoor air quality guideline.

Guideline 24-2015, Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings, provides information on achieving good IAQ that goes beyond the requirements contained in Standard 62.2, Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings, by providing explanatory and educational material not included in the code-intended standard. Guideline 24 is the companion document to Standard 62.2.

“In the 2008 version, we indicated that if a lot of ultrafine particles were expected, higher-efficiency filters should be considered. Period,” Paul Francisco, chair of the Guideline 62.2 committee, said. “Now we say a lot more. We cite research that shows that ultrafine particles are a much more significant concern, and we state explicitly that higher-efficiency filters mean MERV 13 or higher.”

Rick Karg, a member of the Guideline 24 committee who oversaw the revision of the section, notes that particle filters with minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) ratings below 6 are poor at filtering out respirable particulates (typically below 2.5 microns), but can do an acceptable job at removing the large visible particles such as fibers, insects, or large dusts or pollens. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 52.2, Method of Testing General Ventilation Air-Cleaning Devices for Removal Efficiency by Particle Size, specifies removal efficiency values for particulate filters.

“Recent research suggests that mass of particles below 2.5 microns (PM2.5) may be one of the most significant indoor airborne contaminants in terms of chronic health impact in residences of those that have been well studied,” Karg said. “PM2.5 is also the most straightforward contaminant to remove from indoor environments through filtration. MERV 10 rated filters and higher are preferred for removing smaller airborne allergens and PM2.5 particles.”

As such, Guideline 24 recommends that higher-efficiency (MERV 13 and higher) filters should be considered.  Multistage particle filtration (a relatively coarse filter followed by a high-efficiency filter) can help filter out different sized particles without overloading the higher-efficiency filters. When selecting filters, consideration should be given to the effects of the filter’s pressure drop on delivered airflow, fan capacity and energy use, according to Karg.

Other significant changes to Guideline 24 are:

  • Important new definitions, which align the guideline with Standard 62.2.
  • Section 4.3.7 Estimating Health Impacts of Contaminant Exposure.  Discusses the new methods for quantifying the impact of contaminant exposure, including Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALY).
  • Section 5.4.5 Interplay of Mechanical Ventilation and Infiltration. Addresses the important differences between the manner in which balanced and unbalanced mechanical ventilation impact infiltration (natural air leakage). This difference can significantly impact the total ventilation available (mechanical plus infiltration) in a dwelling.

In addition, several other updates were made. Among these are:

  • Tables 4.1, Comparison of Regulations and Guidelines Pertinent to Indoor Environments, and Concentration of Interest for Selected Contaminates. Both of these tables were vetted by a number of experts to bring the data up to date.
  • Significant updates and expansion to Sections 7 Moisture; 8.6,Combustion Appliances; 12, Verification of Equipment Performance; and 13, Ventilation Controls Significant updates and expansion.
  • Section 10 Mechanical Ventilation Systems Design includes significant updates and expansion A new subsection now includes range hoods and the related discussion of the new metric, capture efficiency.
  • References. Approximately 20 references were added and all previous ones were vetted for needed updates.

The cost of Guideline 24-2015, Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings, is $58 ($48, ASHRAE members). To order, visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore or contact ASHRAE Customer Contact Center at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400 (worldwide) or fax 678-539-2129.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 54,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

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ASHRAE bEQ Program Qualifies for Florida Rating System under Energy Bill

Contact: Jodi Scott

Public Relations

678-539-1140

jscott@ashrae.org

 

ASHRAE bEQ Program Qualifies for Florida Rating System under Energy Bill

ATLANTA – Under amended legislation recently signed, the building energy rating and labeling program known as Building Energy Quotient (bEQ) now qualifies as an energy rating option for buildings in the state of Florida.

Florida Governor Rick Scott signed House Bill 7147, which qualifies the bEQ program as an approved system, on Friday, June 13. The provisions in the bill amend a 2013 Florida law specifying requirements for energy ratings for all residential, commercial and state-owned buildings.

“ASHRAE commends the state of Florida for recognizing the importance of requiring collection of the information necessary for making informed decisions about the energy use of buildings where we live, work and play,” ASHRAE President Bill Bahnfleth said. “The ultimate goal of the bEQ program is to promote more energy efficient buildings and give owners more control over rising energy costs, Understanding a building’s energy use characteristics is the critical first step in identifying and implementing measures that will economically and responsibly reduce energy use and costs.”

ASHRAE felt interpretations of the original 2013 law were incorrect, raising questions about how a person or company becomes qualified or approved to provide this rating.

In recent months, ASHRAE worked on an amendment to better define what constitutes an approved building energy efficiency rating system. Under the change, the bEQ program qualifies as an approved system. The bill becomes effective July 1, 2014.

bEQ is a building energy rating and labeling program, offering two labels: an As Designed label that rates the building design’s potential energy use under standardized conditions—independent of the building’s occupancy and usage—and an In Operation label that rates the building’s actual measured metered energy use as influenced by the building’s occupancy, operation and usage.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

DOE Takes First Step in Updating National Reference Standard for Commercial Buildings to 90.1-2013

For Release:

May 19, 2014

Contact: Jodi Scott

Public Relations

678-539-1140

jscott@ashrae.org

DOE Takes First Step in Updating National Reference Standard for Commercial Buildings to 90.1-2013

ATLANTA – Preliminary analysis from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shows that the ASHRAE/IES’s 2013 energy efficiency standard contains energy savings over the 2010 standard of 8.5 percent source energy and 7.6 site energy. This is the first step by the DOE in issuing a ruling that could establish the 2013 standard as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes.

In an announcement in the May 13 edition of “The Federal Register,” DOE attributes the greater energy savings to improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, related to better lighting, fans, commercial refrigeration, boilers and controls.

The DOE is now receiving comments on the preliminary determination. More information can be found at http://www.energycodes.gov/regulations/determinations.

If the preliminary determination is finalized, then states would be required to update their codes to meet or exceed the 2013 standard. Currently, states must meet or exceed the 2010 standard, which serves as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes under the federal Energy Conservation and Production Act.

The DOE noted that the 2013 standard contains 52 positive impacts on energy efficiency that were incorporated into the analysis. These impacts included changes made through the public review process in which users of the standard comment and offer guidance on proposed requirements. Specifically the major positive impacts include:

  • Control requirements for lighting alternations
  • New requirements for individual fans
  • Reduction of energy usage for large boilers
  • Reduction of fan energy usage
  • New efficiency requirements for commercial refrigeration
  • More controls in more spaces and reduction of time to reduction or shut off of those controls
  • Reduction of lighting power density in most building types

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

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