ASHRAE bEQ Program Qualifies for Florida Rating System under Energy Bill

Contact: Jodi Scott

Public Relations

678-539-1140

jscott@ashrae.org

 

ASHRAE bEQ Program Qualifies for Florida Rating System under Energy Bill

ATLANTA – Under amended legislation recently signed, the building energy rating and labeling program known as Building Energy Quotient (bEQ) now qualifies as an energy rating option for buildings in the state of Florida.

Florida Governor Rick Scott signed House Bill 7147, which qualifies the bEQ program as an approved system, on Friday, June 13. The provisions in the bill amend a 2013 Florida law specifying requirements for energy ratings for all residential, commercial and state-owned buildings.

“ASHRAE commends the state of Florida for recognizing the importance of requiring collection of the information necessary for making informed decisions about the energy use of buildings where we live, work and play,” ASHRAE President Bill Bahnfleth said. “The ultimate goal of the bEQ program is to promote more energy efficient buildings and give owners more control over rising energy costs, Understanding a building’s energy use characteristics is the critical first step in identifying and implementing measures that will economically and responsibly reduce energy use and costs.”

ASHRAE felt interpretations of the original 2013 law were incorrect, raising questions about how a person or company becomes qualified or approved to provide this rating.

In recent months, ASHRAE worked on an amendment to better define what constitutes an approved building energy efficiency rating system. Under the change, the bEQ program qualifies as an approved system. The bill becomes effective July 1, 2014.

bEQ is a building energy rating and labeling program, offering two labels: an As Designed label that rates the building design’s potential energy use under standardized conditions—independent of the building’s occupancy and usage—and an In Operation label that rates the building’s actual measured metered energy use as influenced by the building’s occupancy, operation and usage.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

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DOE Takes First Step in Updating National Reference Standard for Commercial Buildings to 90.1-2013

For Release:

May 19, 2014

Contact: Jodi Scott

Public Relations

678-539-1140

jscott@ashrae.org

DOE Takes First Step in Updating National Reference Standard for Commercial Buildings to 90.1-2013

ATLANTA – Preliminary analysis from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) shows that the ASHRAE/IES’s 2013 energy efficiency standard contains energy savings over the 2010 standard of 8.5 percent source energy and 7.6 site energy. This is the first step by the DOE in issuing a ruling that could establish the 2013 standard as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes.

In an announcement in the May 13 edition of “The Federal Register,” DOE attributes the greater energy savings to improvements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings, related to better lighting, fans, commercial refrigeration, boilers and controls.

The DOE is now receiving comments on the preliminary determination. More information can be found at http://www.energycodes.gov/regulations/determinations.

If the preliminary determination is finalized, then states would be required to update their codes to meet or exceed the 2013 standard. Currently, states must meet or exceed the 2010 standard, which serves as the commercial building reference standard for state building energy codes under the federal Energy Conservation and Production Act.

The DOE noted that the 2013 standard contains 52 positive impacts on energy efficiency that were incorporated into the analysis. These impacts included changes made through the public review process in which users of the standard comment and offer guidance on proposed requirements. Specifically the major positive impacts include:

  • Control requirements for lighting alternations
  • New requirements for individual fans
  • Reduction of energy usage for large boilers
  • Reduction of fan energy usage
  • New efficiency requirements for commercial refrigeration
  • More controls in more spaces and reduction of time to reduction or shut off of those controls
  • Reduction of lighting power density in most building types

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

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ASHRAE CRC 2014 – Wichita KS

Information is now available for the 2014 CRC.  Refer to ASHRAE 2014 CRC or visit www.ashrae-wichita.org for further information!

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Ground Source Heat Pumps Focus of Technical Program Track at ASHRAE 2014 Annual Conference

For Release: April 23, 2014

Contact: Jodi ScottPublic Relations678-539-1140 jscott@ashrae.org

Ground Source Heat Pumps Focus of Technical Program Track at ASHRAE 2014 Annual Conference

ATLANTA—A new track added to the Technical Program at ASHRAE’s 2014 Annual Conference speaks to the challenges engineers face when designing ground source heat pumps as compared to more traditional systems.

The Conference takes place June 28-July 2, Seattle, Wash. For more information or to register, visit www.ashrae.org/seattle.

The Technical Program kicks off June 29, with interactive programs and a networking coffee break, and concludes July 2. The program addresses broad topics in the application of technology to practice, specific applications in ground source heat pumps, operations and maintenance and indoor environmental quality, as well as new reports on research taking place worldwide.

New to the Technical Program is a track on Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP) State of the Art: Design, Performance and Research, which addresses all aspects of design that lead to optimally performing systems in addition to avoiding common pitfalls that lead to poorly performing systems.

The track was organized by ASHRAE, the National Ground Water Association (NGWA), the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA) and the Geothermal Exchange Organization (GEO).

“There are a number of challenges that engineers face that are different from conventional HVAC systems, such as ground coupling, working with drillers, the importance of annual heating and cooling loads to ground heat exchanger design,” Jeff Spitler, an ASHRAE member who helped create the track, said. “This track addresses the entire design and installation process from site evaluation to commissioning and system operation. In addition, GSHP systems are inherently energy efficient, but poor choices in the design can compromise this inherent efficiency. ‘What not to do’ is also addressed in the track.”

Spitler said organizers have drawn in researchers from around the world to discuss new advances in the field so attendees have the opportunity to hear about both the latest research and state-of-the-art design practice.

“We want to help practicing engineers understand where the industry began, where it stands currently (what tools and design guides are available), and where it is headed (through the programs showcasing current research),” Lisa Meline, recent chair of ASHRAE’s technical committee 6.8, Geothermal Heat Pump and Energy Recovery Applications, said. “We also hope to impart guidance to the practicing engineers on the ground heat exchanger portion of a ground-source design. Many engineers shy away from this type of design because they don’t understand it. We want to change that and reinforce the need to provide single-point-of responsibility for all different types of HVAC system designs, including this one.”

Sessions in the track are:

Sunday, June 29

  • Step 1: Assessing a Project Site for Geothermal Heat Pump Applications
  • Ground Source Heat Pump System Performance Case Studies in Different Climates Around the World
  • GEO 2.0: From the Ground Up, an Overview of the Updated ASHRAE GSHP ‘Blue Book’
  • Ground Source Heat Pump System Case Studies

Monday, June 30

  • Geothermal Heat Pump Track Keynote Presentation
  • Documentation and Contract Administration in Tendered and Design/Build Ground-Coupled Heat Pump Projects
  • Ground Source Heat Pumps: Historical Perspective and Track Overview

Tuesday, July 1

  • Monitoring of Ground Source Heat Pump Systems
  • What the Well?
  • New Developments in Simulation and Modeling of Ground Heat Exchangers

Wednesday, July 2

  • Ground Source Systems Commissioning and Closeout: Unique Issues, Avoiding Fatal Flaws and Ensuring Client Satisfaction
  • Central Plant GCHP Systems
  • Optimization of Ground Coupled Heat Exchangers and Heat Pumps

The Conference takes place at the Sheraton Seattle and the Washington State Convention Center. To register or more information, visit www.ashrae.org/seattle.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a global society advancing human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. The Society and its more than 50,000 members worldwide focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

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ASHRAE Publishes 2013 Version of Thermal Comfort Standard

ATLANTA – Major revisions for design and measurement of comfortable spaces are included in a newly published 2013 standard from ASHRAE.

ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-2013, Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy, combines the 2010 standard and 18 published addenda into a consolidated standard. The core of the standard in Sections 4 and 5 specifies methods to determine thermal environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, air speed and radiant effects) in buildings and other spaces that a significant proportion of the occupants will find acceptable at a certain metabolic rate and clothing level.

Section 7 of the standard includes new requirements for the measurement and evaluation of existing thermal environments and is also applicable to commissioning.

The standard has been re-written with a renewed focus on application by practitioners and use of clear, enforceable language.  Requirements are now clearly stated and calculation procedures appear sequentially.

Other noteworthy additions to the standard include an allowance for the cooling effect of air movement as a way to extend the upper limit of the comfort zone in naturally conditioned spaces and addition of a predictive model for occupant clothing behavior based on extensive field research. These additions provide new methods for improving occupant comfort while minimizing energy use, according to Gwelen Paliaga, chair of the committee that wrote the standard.

Documentation requirements to show that a design meets Standard 55 are contained in Section 6 and a sample compliance form is provided in appendix J.  Both of these sections are clarified and streamlined for use by owners and third party rating systems.

The 18 addenda published since 2010 are summarized in detail in Informative Appendix M, and the most noteworthy changes are summarized here:

  • The normative body of the standard, comprising Sections 3 through 8, have been rewritten and reorganized.
  • Requirements are more clearly stated, definitions are added to Section 3, and informative supporting information has been moved from the body to informative appendices.
  • Procedures are clarified and appear in a more sequential manner.   For example, a “representative occupant” with representative “clothing insulation” and “metabolic rate” shall be defined as input into thermal comfort calculations.
  • The cooling effect of air movement now applies to naturally conditioned spaces as well as mechanically conditioned spaces, and in each case correction factors are given that adjust the comfort boundaries when air movement is present.
  • A new alternate procedure for estimating occupant clothing insulation based on outdoor weather was added.  This procedure is based on extensive field research and can be used for design calculations, annual simulations and control of occupied spaces.
  • Major revisions to Section 7 procedures for measuring comfort in existing spaces including survey and physical measurement methods and a new section on evaluating and reporting results.
  • The standard now requires that two of the key comfort parameters, air speed and air temperature, must be calculated as an average that the occupant experiences at three heights across the body and over a period of time.

The cost of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55-2013, Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy, is $95 ($81, ASHRAE members). To order, contact ASHRAE Customer Contact Center at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400 (worldwide), fax 678-539-2129, or visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today.


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ASHRAE Publishes 2013 Version of IAQ Standard

For Release:                                                                                               
Oct. 24, 2013      

Contact: Jodi Scott
Public Relations
678-539-11140
jscott@ashrae.org

 

 ASHRAE Publishes 2013 Version of IAQ Standard

ATLANTA – The 2013 version of ASHRAE’s indoor air quality standard contains several revisions to help users better meet its requirements.

Newly published, ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2013, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, sets minimum ventilation rates and other requirements for commercial and institutional buildings.

The 2013 standard combines the 2010 standard and 10 published addenda to that edition, providing an easy-to-use consolidated standard. Specific information on the contents of each addendum and approval dates for each addendum are included in Informative Appendix J at the end of the standard.

“The 2013 version of Standard 62.1 continues the trend of increasing clarity while adding flexibility,” Roger Hedrick, Standard 62.1 committee chair, said. “These changes will allow designers and building operators to meet the requirements of the standard and provide adequate ventilation airflow to occupants while reducing excess ventilation and the associated energy consumption. “

The 2013 edition of the standard revises and improves the standard in several ways. A number of changes remove inconsistencies within the standard and improve clarity. Significant changes include:

  • Table 6-2, Zone Air Distribution Effectiveness is modified to increase the ventilation effectiveness of underfloor air distribution systems that meet certain conditions. 
  • Requirements for the quality of water used in humidification systems are modified and clarified.
  • Building level pressurization requirements were clarified, including adding a definition of “exfiltration.” 
  • A performance alternative to the prescriptive exhaust rates is added.  This approach differs from the Indoor Air Quality Procedure, the existing performance-based method for setting supply ventilation rates, in that monitoring of the concentrations of contaminants of concern is required and provides the basis for control of exhaust flow rates. 
  • Some changes to the ventilation rates and space types in Table 6-1 are made.  These add refrigerated warehouses and change the ventilation rate for sports related spaces to include a per occupant component which then allows the use of demand controlled ventilation in these spaces. 
  • The filtration requirement on air entering wetted cooling coils has been modified to change the MERV rating from 6 to 8.  This change will reduce potential for particulate deposition on the coils that could lead to biological or other contamination on the coils. 
  • Toilet exhaust air that is cleaned to Class 1 may be recirculated. 

The cost of ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2013, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality, is $79 ($67 ASHRAE members). To order, contact ASHRAE Customer Contact Center at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400 (worldwide), fax 678-539-2129, or visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today.

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ASHRAE New York Tech Program Puts Special Focus on Tall Buildings, International Design, Building Performance

For Release:                                                                                               
Oct 22, 2013      

Contact: Amanda Dean
Public Relations
678-539-1216
adean@ashrae.org
 

ASHRAE New York Tech Program Puts Special Focus on Tall Buildings, International Design, Building Performance

ATLANTA—It’s only appropriate that in a city known for skyscrapers—home to nearly 600—that the 2014 ASHRAE Winter Conference Technical Program puts a special focus on the design, development and operation of tall buildings when it visits New York City, Jan. 18-22.

“The ASHRAE Technical Program offers a great opportunity to learn from fellow professionals and experts,” Jon Cohen, New York Conference program chair, said. “Also, ASHRAE is continuously improving the Conference experience to incorporate additional networking opportunities, in addition to focusing on technical content.”

The Technical Program begins Sunday, Jan. 19, and will follow the successful new format introduced earlier in the year at the 2013 Annual Conference: special hour-long interactive sessions with audience participation, followed by a networking coffee break.

The Technical Program features more than 200 sessions and offers dozens of opportunities to earn New York PDHs, AIA LUs and LEED AP credits.

In a nod to New York City, with its instantly recognizable skyline of towering buildings, the Tall Buildings: Performance Meets Policy track looks at opportunities in the design, development and operation of tall and super-tall buildings. The track also presents the measured and measurable use of utilities, envelope (infiltration and exfiltration), building pressure, waste handling, elevators, carbon and adaptive reuse. Sessions of interest include “Is ASHRAE Tall Enough for Tall Buildings?;” “Linking Tall Buildings’ Energy Use to Tenant Contribution to Economy;” and “Life Safety Issues with Tall Buildings.” The innovative features in tall buildings offer attendees design ideas for applications in smaller-sized buildings.

Additionally, as New York is a city on the world stage, the International Design track addresses innovative design strategies to meet environmental elements, geography and cultures. Examine “Energy Saving Strategy of Large-Scale University Facilities;” several sessions on “Cutting Edge Japanese Technologies;” “Sustainable Development in Africa;” and “European Union: Practical Benchmarking of HVAC System Energy Efficiency,” to name just a few.

Building Information Systems investigates how building control technologies are integrated and used for building management, operation and efficiency. An interesting session of note is “App, App and Away: Enabling Meaningful Work for the Building Professional with the Development of Quality Apps for Smartphones and Tablet Computers,” which explores the evolution of apps; the methods for developing and establishing a reliable app to provide an accessible and verifiable way for building professional to solve practical problems; and looks at areas of potential app development.

Hydronic System Design addresses innovative design, system components and research and case studies of their application, including unintended consequences. Sessions include the three part session “Efficient Technologies that are Also Economically Sustainable;” “Hydronic System Acoustics;” and “Energy Efficient Single Pipe Hydronic System Design for Large and Tall Buildings.”

The Environmental Health through Indoor Environmental Quality track includes developing, evaluating and predicting optimal indoor environmental conditions, and features case histories, lessons learned and advice to operators and designers about IEQ, as well as disaster recovery in buildings affected by hurricanes and floods. A few of the track offerings include “Indoor Air Environment and Heat Recovery Ventilation in a Passive School Building;” “A Comprehensive Look at Infectious Disease and Air Filtration in Healthcare Facilities: Energy Saving, IAQ Performance, and What Makes You Sick;” and “Lessons Learned from Storm Recovery.”

Additional tracks include Building Performance and Commissioning, Systems and Equipment and Fundamentals and Applications.

The Technical Program runs Sunday through Wednesday, Jan. 19-22, at the New York Hilton. Advance registration closes Dec. 31, after which registration fees increase to “onsite” pricing.  Register for the Conference at www.ashrae.org/newyork.

The International Air-Conditioning, Heating, Refrigerating Expo®, held in conjunction with the Winter Conference, runs Jan. 21-23. The Expo, held at the Javits Convention Center, takes place Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday as opposed to the traditional Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. More information is available at www.ahrexpo.com.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today.


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ASHRAE/IES Publish First Standard Focused on Commissioning Process

For Release:                                                                                                  
Sept. 26, 2013

Contact: Jodi Scott
Public Relations
678-539-1140
jscott@ashrae.org

ASHRAE/IES Publish First Standard Focused on Commissioning Process

ATLANTA – A newly published standard focused on the commissioning process will help ensure a fully functional, fine-tuned facility.

ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 202, Commissioning Process for Buildings and Systems, identifies the minimum acceptable commissioning process for buildings and systems as described in ASHRAE’s Guideline 0-2005, The Commissioning Process. Standard 202 is ASHRAE’s first standard focused on the commissioning process. The commissioning process as detailed in Standard 202 applies to all construction projects and systems and is an industry consensus document.

“Given the integration and interdependency of facility systems, a performance deficiency in one system can result in less than optimal performance by other systems,” Gerald Kettler, P.E., chair of the committee that wrote the standard, said. “Implementing the Commissioning Process is intended to reduce the project capital cost through the warranty period and also reduce the life-cycle cost of the facility. Using this integrated process results in a fully functional, fine-tuned facility, with complete documentation of its systems and assemblies and trained operations and maintenance personnel.”

The commissioning process assumes that owners, programmers, designers, contractors and operations and maintenance entities are fully accountable for the quality of their work. The process begins at project inception and continues for the life of a facility.

The process includes specific tasks to be conducted to verify that design, construction, verification, testing, documentation and training meet the owner’s project requirements, according to Kettler.

The standard defines the commissioning process through 13 functional steps, each of which contains deliverables. The commissioning activities and deliverable are as follows:

  • Initiate the Commissioning Process, including defining roles and responsibilities
  • Define the project requirements, which results in the  Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) document
  • Develop commissioning plan – produces a written Commissioning Process Plan
  • Plan design approach to Owners Project Requirements – defines the basis of design
  • Set contractor commissioning requirement, which are included in the commissioning specifications
  • Design review by the commissioning authority provides feedback and a design review report
  • Submittals review verifies compliance with the OPR in a submittal review report
  • Observation  & Testing verifies system performance with results documented in construction checklists and reports
  • Issues resolution coordination is done with an issues and resolution log
  • Systems manual assembly results in a systems manual for building operation
  • Conduct training for building operations with training plans and records
  • Post occupancy operation commissioning provides an end of warranty commissioning report
  • Assembly of a commissioning report captures all the project commissioning documentation

Other commissioning guidance from ASHRAE includes Guideline 0-2005, The Commissioning Process; Guideline 1.1-2007, HVAC&R Technical Requirements for the Commissioning Process; and Guideline 1.5-2012, The Commissioning Process for Smoke Control Systems.

ASHRAE also is working on several other guidelines related to commissioning:  Guideline 0.2P, The Commissioning Process for Existing Systems and Assemblies; Guideline 1.2P, The Commissioning Process for Existing HVAC&R Systems; Guideline 1.3P, Building Operation and Maintenance Training for the HVAC&R Commissioning Process; and Guideline 1.4P, Procedures for Preparing Facility Systems Manuals.

The cost of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 202-2013, Commissioning Process for Buildings and Systems, is $72 ($61, ASHRAE members). To order, contact ASHRAE Customer Contact Center at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400 (worldwide), fax 678-539-2129, or visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today. More information can be found at www.ashrae.org/news.

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Industry Reaps the Benefits of ASHRAE Scholarships

For Release:                                                                                               
Sept. 23, 2013      

Contact: Amanda Dean
Public Relations
678-539-1216
adean@ashrae.org
 

Industry Reaps the Benefits of ASHRAE Scholarships

ATLANTA—“The ASHRAE scholarship program is making a difference in the lives of the outstanding students that it touches.”

That’s according to David Meredith, chair of the ASHRAE Scholarship Trustees on awarding $106,000 in scholarship money for the 2013-2014 academic year.

“When I look at the global leadership that past scholarship recipients have demonstrated throughout their professional career, I am proud of what the ASHRAE Scholarship Program has been able to accomplish,” Meredith said.  “I can’t wait to see how this year’s recipients help shape our future.”

The recipients of ASHRAE’s scholarship assistance include the following:

  • Reuben Trane Scholarship: $10,000 to be awarded over two years, Richard Melo, Wentworth Institute of Technology, mechanical engineering. The scholarship was established by the Trane Co. in memory of its founder, an innovative engineer, inventor and business executive.
  • Willis H. Carrier Scholarships: $10,000 for one year, Breeann Foran, Montana State University, mechanical engineering; and Nicholas Rekstad, Pennsylvania State University, architectural engineering. The scholarship was established by the Carrier Corp. in memory of its founder, who installed the world’s first scientifically designed air-conditioning system.
  • Lynn G. Bellenger Engineering Scholarship: $5,000 for one year, Tiffany Williams, North Carolina A&T State University, architectural engineering. The scholarship, which is being awarded for the first time this year, recognizes a female undergraduate engineering student. It is named in memory of the Presidential Member Lynn G. Bellenger, the Society’s first female president.
  • Frank M. Coda Scholarship: $5,000 for one year, Travis Norris, East Carolina University, mechanical engineering. The scholarship was created in memory of ASHRAE’s former executive vice president, who served from 1981-2004.
  • David C.J. Peters Scholarship: $5,000 for one year, Mei Yung Wong, Oklahoma State University, mechanical engineering. The scholarship is awarded to a third-year student in a four-year undergraduate mechanical engineering program or a fourth-year student in a five-year undergraduate mechanical engineering program at Pennsylvania State University, Virginia Tech, California State University, Oklahoma State University, University of Texas, Clemson University, North Carolina State University, University of Nebraska, Cal Poly State University and University of Nevada. The scholarship was created by Southland Industries to honor Peters, an advocate of recruiting quality.
  • General Scholarships: $5,000 for one year, Mitchell Hoesing, South Dakota State University, mechanical engineering; and Peter Kohler, University of North Carolina, mechanical engineering.
  • Memorial Scholarship: $5,000 for one year, Nathan Stoltzfus, Ohio State University, agricultural engineering.

The following awards provide one-year $3,000 scholarships:

  • Lynn G. Bellenger Engineering Technology Scholarship: Sara Piekunka, Rochester Institute of Technology, mechanical engineering technology. The scholarship recognizes female engineering technology students and is named in memory of Presidential Member Bellenger. This is the first year that the scholarship is being awarded
  • Region III Boggarm S. Setty Scholarship: Hunter Bachman, University of Delaware, mechanical engineering. This scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate engineering student attending an institution within ASHRAE Region III, which covers Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Washington, D.C., and is named after Boggram Setty, Fellow ASHRAE, Life Member.  
  • Duane Hanson Scholarship: Kim Rogers, Kettering University, mechanical engineering. The scholarship was established by Gayner Engineers and is named for the company’s former president.
  • Alwin B. Newton Scholarship: Man Sze Chan, The University of Hong Kong, building services engineering. The scholarship is named for an industry pioneer and ASHRAE Fellow who was granted 219 patents.
  • Henry Adams Scholarship: Mahmoud Mohammed, University of Illinois, mechanical engineering. The scholarship was established by Henry Adams, Inc. in memory of its founder, a Charter Member and sixth president of ASHRAE’S predecessor society, ASHVE, established in 1899.
  • Region VIII Scholarship: Gaizka Lasa, University of Oklahoma, industrial engineering. The scholarship is awarded to students attending schools within the geographic boundaries of ASHRAE Region VIII, which includes Arkansas, Oklahoma, Mexico and parts of Louisiana and Texas.
  • Donald E. Nichols Scholarship: Anthony Taylor, Tennessee Technological University, mechanical engineering. The scholarship is awarded to an undergraduate engineering student attending Tennessee Technological University. It is named for a former ASHRAE vice president and graduate of Tennessee Technological University.   
  • Bachelor of Engineering Technology Scholarship: Yoginder Rana, Ferris State University, HVAC&R technology.
  • Associate of Engineering Technology Scholarship: Cody Bomers, Grand Rapids Community College, HVAC&R Technology.
  • High School Senior Scholarships: Elizabeth Lynch, Iowa State University, engineering; Jacquelyn Sommers, Kansas State University, architectural engineering; Joshua Roper, University of Wisconsin, mechanical engineering; and Kali Rosendo, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, environmental engineering. The scholarships were established in 2010 for high school seniors entering their freshman year of college in an engineering or engineering technology program.

Over the course of 24 years ASHRAE has awarded over $1.3 million to approximately 275 deserving undergraduate and graduate students. For more information on ASHRAE scholarships, visit www.ashrae.org/scholarships. Applications are now being accepted for the 2014-15 undergraduate, regional/chapter and university-specific scholarships. The deadline is Dec. 1, 2013.

ASHRAE, founded in 1894, is a building technology society with more than 50,000 members worldwide. The Society and its members focus on building systems, energy efficiency, indoor air quality, refrigeration and sustainability. Through research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE shapes tomorrow’s built environment today.

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Advanced Roof Top Unit Webinar

Advanced Roof Top Unit Webinar

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Next Page »

Welcome to the Black Hills ASHRAE Chapter website! The next meeting will be November 20th at SDSM&T in the Hisega Room.